Showing posts with label duck confit. Show all posts
Showing posts with label duck confit. Show all posts

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Croquer: Flying Pig

This spring's Silver Lake Jubilee may have been a sleepy alternative to the overcooked Sunset Junction summer cluster-you-know-what, but the Jubilee definitely represented what LA's current mobile food scene has to offer. One newbie to me was the cotton candy pink truck donning a flying pig called.. Flying Pig.
James Seitz's menu transposes Asian and Pacific Rim recipes using Le Cordon Bleu French technique, proffering some tasty results.
First on my list was the braised pork belly with red onion escabeche, pickled sesame cucumber, death sauce on a steamed bao bun - basically a chocomeat bushwhack, reason enough to seek out the pink truck.
Furthering me admiration was the spicy pork taco of marinated pork shoulder with green papaya, black sesame seeds, cilantro cream, and death sauce.
And for dessert the tamarind duck taco - Duck confit with pickled red beets, toasted almonds, radish sprouts, mandarin orange, and tamarind gravy. YUM.

Don't wait for Sunday dim sum, seek out this sucker.
flyingpigtruck.com

Monday, April 26, 2010

Croquer: Mercantile

A perfect brunch is the quickest way to my heart. Despite my intense love for Los Angeles, there has always been a fallow pocket in said heart awaiting its unrequited. Many have come close, but after living in Portland where brunch is quite literally sanctified, I will be the first to admit how high my standards are. Enter the modest and saintly Mercantile. Quietly it entered the scene some months ago tucked in an offbeat stretch of Sunset not used to the weekend brunch crowd. Which immediately made me like it. Still rarely overcrowded, Mercantile offers an extremely level-headed, approachable, and knowledgeable staff, a casual no-frills setting, yet incredibly high end food. It is something this city has been begging for, and I'm praying it continues to deliver.
Serving double as a marketplace, Mercantile has a stocked cheese case, shelves of condiments, affordable hard-to-find house-packed spices, Dolin Vermouth (the best), imported oils and vinegars, and a sinful display of daily homemade doughnuts, 'oreos', canneles, other breakfast goodies and gorgeous desserts.
Once seated in the main market space, lofted dining room, patio or bar, a clipboard displays their brunch menu and all its country comfort glory. If it's a hair of the dog morning, Mercantile makes a mean housemade bloody mary served in a frosty mason jar. Of course there's always a mimosa, but for a twist try their French 75, gin blended with lemon, lime, and orange zest, a splash of juice from each, and topped with sparkling wine.
My first bite at Mercantile was the Chilaquiles (always a defining breakfast dish), theirs made with a pumpkin seed chile sauce, topped with cotija and a sunny side up eggs. A robust, crispy take on the dish, perfectly cooked eggs bolstering a thumbs up.
To share at the table, the Ginger Snap Pancakes with vanilla soaked prunes, mascarpone & almonds. What sounds saccharine is actually quite spicy and refined, a trace of syrup on the plate the only truly sweet component. Recommended for those tempted by breakfast's sweet side, but easily overwhelmed by sugar.
The winner of the first visit was the genius Southern Benedict, poached eggs atop corn meal cakes, a hearty crab-tasso ham ragout, mustard greens, and a purely evil Tabasco hollandaise! Spicy, crabby and decadent.. a veritable Louisiana hangover helper.

Other winners I've had since (oh yes, I've been back) include the Duck Confit Hash with sunny-side up egg, sweet potato, wild arugula, candied black walnut, caramelized onion and mustard. But my favorite dish to date is the Maple Glazed Pork Belly. Quite the "it" dish lately, this pork belly stands apart as probably the best I've ever had, tender and smoky with a kiss of woody sweetness, served over white grits, topped with scallions, and sunny side up egg, and drizzled with a fine maple reduction. Magnifique!

Do yourself a favor this weekend and enter Mercantile's warm embrace.

6600 West Sunset Blvd. Hollywood; 323.962.8202
themercantilela.com
The Mercantile on Urbanspoon

Monday, January 11, 2010

Croquer: Cacao Mexicatessen

In a nearby mysterious land known as Eagle Rock, cool things can soar under the radar for ages, effortlessly being cool and raking in passing raves like underground legends. Take The Oinkster, Fatty's, Auntie Em's or Colorado Wine Co., all incredible, yet casually accessible whenever you make the trek out to meet them. Add a new neighborhood hero to the list, Cacao Mexicatessen.Part taco shop, part Mexican deli, part gourmet Latin food purveyor, Cacao modestly shares a Spanish duplex with a flower shop, and quietly serves the most incredibly inventive and authentic tacos this side of the border. They make and sell all their own salsas, hot sauces and moles. Their cooler case also features an interesting selection of Mexican cheeses, shelves adorned with imported candies, condiments, high-end Mexican cocoa tablets, piloncillo cones, and tamarind coated apples.After taking it all in, we ordered at the counter and sat outside on the quaint patio. Their thin and crisp restaurant style chips (which are bizarrely rare in LA) and spicy puréed salsa already had most of the city beat within minutes of sitting. To drink I decided to start with their signature - How can you come to a place called Cacao and not try their Mexican hot cocoa? As it was a weekend morning, I opted for coffee with mine and got the Azteca Mocha Latte. This divine (massive!) mug was a rich frothy treat with cinnamon, almond, chile de arbol, and chipotle notes. The spice awoke my senses before the caffeine had an opportunity. I'd certainly come back for this alone.Little did I know, the best was yet to come... Cat and I ordered a sampling of their more interesting taco options (there are many) which came out on a large platter with radishes and fresh lime wedges.First bite was the Camarones Enchipotlados - shrimp in chipotle with citrus. Tangy, spicy and wet, it was a satisfying start. Cacao's homemade tortillas are larger and thicker than most local joints, with that much more space to fill with the good stuff! Next was a bite of the Flor De Calabaza - squash blossoms, poblano strips, queso fresco. Delicate and lovely! I always appreciate the use of squash blossoms - who said vegetarian has to be boring?The next bite may have been my favorite - the Tocino Enchocolatado - supple bacon, Salsa de Cacao, avocado, and crema mexicana. This spicy sweet choco-bacon goodness has to be tried!
Unfortunately after that the Hongo De Portobello (Portobello mushroom, spinach, onion, queso fresco) was less than memorable.My interest was piqued again with the next two, first the Carnitas De Pato, or duck confit (listed with avocado, vinegar, onion, radishes, chile oil... But mine came with just the duck meat - that aside, it was the most succulent yet crispy duck! Very tasty on its own!). And lastly, the Cochinita Pibil reminded me why I wake up in the morning, a moist robust roasted pork in achiote with citrus and pickled onions. The most satisfying three bites of food anyone could ask for. After wiping my brow, and thanking everyone back inside, only a matchbox chocolate tamale stood between me and the sublime.

1576 Colorado Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90041; 323.478.2791
cacaodeli.com

Friday, May 29, 2009

Croquer: Barbrix

"It's.. across from Baller Hardware.. somewhere.." I squinted for a sign whilst scanning the street for parking. I felt pretty silly, I know this stretch of riverwinding Hyperion like the ceiling above my bed, yet could not visualize which structure must house newest Silver Lake hot spot Barbrix. We parked easily on this quiet curve before the final congested drag down toward Trader Joe's, and after passing a tall hedge found ourselves smack dab in the middle of a packed parking lot neither of us could recall existing, leading to a set-back cottage, a bustling front patio strewn with strings of white bulbs.
This was a scene. Or rather a strange amalgamation of one. Admittedly not exactly the Silver Lake I am used to, but also very much what Silver Lake is becoming. Neither good or bad, just different. We were led past the packed bar and back outside to a tiny two-top at the corner of the small patio, beside a table of sunglass-wearing (at 8:30pm) angular-hair-styled rocker types downing glasses of red wine. On the other side of the patio, a pair of elder couples laughed over dessert. In between these tables, two suited men sat with bulbous over-sized Bordeaux glasses, staring intently into the beyond, wine lists twitching in their hands.
Claudio Blotta just upped the anty, and as wonky as Silver Lake's sea legs looked tonight, the undying crowd and waiting list were also proving to be game. A managing partner at Campanile for 11 years, previous Vice President of La Brea Bakery, and co-founder (and wine director) of La Terza, Blotta is no stranger to the 'scenes' of Los Angeles. With chef Don Dickman (formerly of Rocca) writing the ever-changing menu of Mediterranean-inspired small plates and hefty cheese/charcuterie list, Barbrix enters the race way ahead of the game.So it comes as little surprise that the wine list is just short of jaw-dropping. "Brix" after all refers to sugar measurements in wine, so goes without saying Blotta means business. The initial impressive aspect is the entire first page of glass-pours. My date was stuck on the cool beer list of small-batch American, Belgian and English ales (even carrying an ale from my favorite Canadian brewery Unibroue) complete with tasting notes - So I knew wine by the glass was my road tonight, and a welcomed one with this list. Feeling the spirit of Barbrix start to sink in, now officially entering my [dangerous] mode bon vivant, I ordered the '06 Feraud-Brunel Châteauneuf du Pape (a steal at $10 - which is also the most expensive pour on the list). Generally of my favorite Rhône wines, this Châteauneuf du Pape -though chock full of berry fruit and subtle spice- was less structured than I had anticipated. Keep in mind while tasting this my eyes were skimming the robust and luscious sounding meat entrees. I knew I would need a glass of something bigger a little later, especially once I read about the duck confit and prime skirt steak tagliata. My date opted for the Abita Andygator helles doppelbock from Louisiana, a fragrant and rich malty lager which was very tasty.
Now there is something up front that needs to be said about this menu - It can be extremely affordable for such fare - A winning detail that Blotta earns high marks for. Everything is served in small portions, but at $5-12 and pop for most, it becomes up to the diner to decide whether to splurge or simply enjoy a light inexpensive meal. Well, this particular Friday night after a long week, my date and decided to pull out the stops and enjoy it right.We ordered three cheeses ($12) from the interesting list, settling on the Gorroxta (Catalonia, Spain) natural rind goat's milk, the Piave (Veneto, Italy) hard cow's milk, and the Epoisses (Bourgogne, France) marc-washed cow's milk, served with sliced baguette, dried figs, quince paste, and marcona almonds. Gorroxta is semi-firm and was the mildest in flavor - smooth with a hint of nuttiness. The Piave is a hard cheese with a little more full-bodied flavor, reminiscent of Parmigiano Reggiano - delicious with the sweet quince. The Epoisses won the medal though. A soft and incredibly pungent tart 'stinky cheese' that puckered our mouths into smiles. We ordered the Rosette de Lyon from the charcuterie list, a French dry sausage flavored with spices and wine, but we didn't realize until days later that it never came! Sadly even worse, looking back at the receipt, we were charged for it.
Neither of us had planned on this early summer evening in LA to get cold, but a crisp breeze was weaving through the hills and right past our corner table. A gas heater was even on behind my date, but so low it didn't seem to be emanating heat. A server (though not our own) came next with our vegetable course. When he set the plates down we asked if there was any way he could maybe just turn the knob up a tidbit. The server looked irritated with the request(!) and said no(!), scurrying quickly away. I looked at my date, smiling in awe "Well, I guess he's the food runner then!" Within minutes however a busser came to turn up the heat. Attention was turned immediately to the dishes in front of us.The first was the Farmers Plate ($6), a small sampling of simple roasted beets sweetened with saba (a syrupy grape must), roasted carrots with honey & mint, eggplant moussaka and pickled ramps. Each small and tender bite was loaded with bursting sweet flavors, the complexity of the moussaka and delightful ramp perhaps my favorites. The crispy grilled polenta with oyster & shitake mushrooms and creamy gorgonzola fonduta ($5) was another "crowd"-pleaser. Creamy smooth, with delicate mushrooms and that gorgonzola tang, I could have eaten five!The next dish to arrive (at this point everything started coming out as the kitchen produced them, not formal courses) was the Roasted Niman Ranch Pork Belly ($11) stuffed alla 'porchetta' and topped with salsa verde. I was looking forward to this dish perhaps most of all, but it was the disappointment of the evening. The thick slice was largely inedible, with a blubbery core and a rock hard skin (literally - we couldn't cut through it with our knives). We dissected out the soft flesh which was tender and flavor-rich, but with a gamey funk that we simultaneously admitted turned both of us off.
As I could see our final two plates coming toward us, I looked around unable to locate our server, the near-empty wine glass in front of me on my mind. The one thing about the continuous courses that I found - well, really more difficult for the servers than anything, who often weren't running the food - was the lack of regular contact with their customers. Sure, we constantly had food in front of us so were more or less "set", and she would check in occassionally at random to see if we were enjoying everything (which we were), but 90% of the time, if a diner needs something, they will realize it just after a course is dropped. Another drink, a condiment, a missing utensil. And we learned pretty quickly how helpful the food runners were... For myself, when a waiter, the 30 second rule was always in full effect - Checking in no more than 30 seconds after a course is dropped. To our obviously overwhelmed server this Friday night, I understand constant courses makes that near-impossible, but I did notice that whenever we did need the love, she wasn't available. Call me particular about service (I am), and I'm not one of those diners that let's little things like this ruin and experience (for it did not), and I am always gracious, but boy, looking down at the several bites of succulent prime steak and an empty wine glass.. Oy!
It was about halfway through our entrées when our server did come by (slightly out of breath it even seemed), and for a larger wine to enjoy with my steak she suggested the '05 Raices de Aza Tempranillo ($7), to which I thanked her. I normally may have been slightly more grumpy at that point in the situation, but I began to notice our very sweet server was dealing with an extremely needy [read: rude] table of diners who I overheard were very late being seated (and by the glinting of all those jewels the type you know doesn't often have to wait). Hopelessly empathetic (GOD have I been there), the wine ceased to matter. Plus our spectacular entrées were a lovely distraction.The prime skirt steak "tagliata" ($12) was seared and sliced, served over wild arugula with parmegiano-reggiano and balsamico. We ordered medium-rare and boy did we get it, juicy and red, only the very outside seared dark and crispy. This was good steak, people. But my favorite of the whole night may actually be the duck leg confit with pommes sardalaise and fig vin cotto ($10). Wow. This was when Blotta came by, delivering the wine. I shook his hand, thanking him for the incredible meal. He saw we had the duck and whispered that the secret is the potatoes, "they're cooked in the duck fat!" he glanced over both shoulders to make sure no one had eavesdropped. I have had duck confit before, small legs of somewhat greasy meat that have never exceeded expectations. Until now, I suppose. The duck leg at Barbrix was actually quite large, incredibly moist but nowhere near greasy, lightly savory and clean, the earthy sweet fig glaze a perfect foil... And Blotta wasn't wrong, the buttery, garlicky crisp potatoes with succulent sweet onions were like comfort food of the gods. When the busser came by to remove some plates, my date's hand shot protectively over the duck "oh we will pick at this one for a while, thank you!"
Feeling incredibly stuffed, and more than anything happy, I doubted dessert was in the plan. But I am the type who is easily convinced. So when our server stole a moment to come by (the gripey table just received a round of prosecco and appetizers on the house), I was surprised to hear my date's "so what's good for dessert here?" Our server smiled, as if in on a secret. What I liked about her was that throughout the entire evening, she was very honest. Meaning, if we were debating between a couple of items, her disposition subtly guided us what to choose. By dessert though we had developed a trust, and she told us exactly what to get! (Note: I will always respect a server who is honest and wants you to actually ENJOY what you order).Two glasses of '08 Oddero Moscato D'Asti were delivered (though I love moscato, it is the only dessert wine offered by the glass, a strong revision suggestion I have for a conscious enoteca like Barbrix). The moscato was crisp and elegant, a perfect match for what came next, Adria’s Favorite Ginger Shortcakes ($6). The lightly crunchy shortcakes are baked with both fresh and candied ginger (pow! zing!) and come loaded with fresh whipped cream and tart-sweet berry compote. We loved this! Our server also brought a red velvet item new to the menu that night, which was actually local bakeshop Cakemonkey's Raspberry Red Velvet Cakewich ($6) served with a drizzle of creme anglaise. Initially slightly disappointed it wasn't house-made, the layered red velvet cake filled with a raspberry vanilla creme layer and coated in Bittersweet Chocolate was pretty darn tasty. Like a super fancy red velvet Ding Dong.
I left Barbrix beyond satisfied. Sure there were a few loose bricks in the road, but only weeks out from opening things could go much worse. The tweaks I see needed are MINOR, the foundation of this little schoolhouse-turned-bistro pretty solid. Plus I can't recall the last time I enjoyed a three hour meal this much! The bar is officially raised for this sleepy little neighborhood, but most importantly, the price is right.

2442 Hyperion Ave, Silver Lake; 323.662.2442
barbrix.com